Brazil’s Most Controversial Government Program

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A common characteristic of developing nations is the high rate of urbanization and subsequent disparate development between regions. Brazil being no exception to this rule, the effect is quite far-reaching in the healthcare industry. More than 90 percent of medical professionals are concentrated in areas that cover less than 10 percent of the country. A program launched by the federal government in 2011 to address this problem failed to attract but one third of the required number of doctors to address this problem. Consequently, it was replaced with a new program: Mais Médicos (more doctors).

Overseen by the World Health Organization, this three-year program aims to alleviate the unequal geographical distribution of healthcare professionals by bringing them in from abroad. Fifteen thousand doctors from Cuba, Portugal, Argentina, and Spain were to work in these remote areas. Yet while government initiatives with such laudable goals generally tend to garner plenty of popular support among Brazilians, Mais Médicos has been shrouded in controversy from its inception. Industry representatives, students and the Ministry of Labor have taken aim at the program, A conservative magazine even went so far as to accuse Cuban doctors of being “communist spies” infiltrating the country.

In a mere 12 months (Mais Médicos went into effect in July 2013) the program has become arguably the most controversial one implemented by the Dilma administration. While the Cuban healthcare system has a relatively good reputation the fact that a significant chunk of Brazilian tax money directly funds the communist Cuban state makes some feel quite uncomfortable. The Brazilian Medical Association and the Federal Council of Medicine have been encouraging healthcare professionals to voice their opposition in the form of protests and strikes. They even went to the Supreme Court last August in an attempt to roll back the program, stating foreign doctors were illegally practicing medicine without a license.

When the Court ruled in favor of the government, critics started taking another angle, claiming Cuban doctors were being exploited and comparing them to feudal serfs. At a university ceremony in Fortaleza where newcomers were to take classes for three weeks prior to becoming part of the public healthcare system, the doctors were harassed by a group of unionized healthcare workers calling them “slaves” and “incompetents”.

Controversy and name calling aside, the solution is really very simple. Extraordinarily high tuition fees for Brazilian medical schools have largely restricted access to the medical profession to the upper class. Though annual fees ranging from approximately $18,000 to $54,000 may not seem exorbitant to a Western mind, a GDP per capita of only $12,100 makes going to medical school a pipedream for the average Brazilian. Without a university degree, however, one is not licensed to practice medicine. It should be no surprise, then, that graduates start their careers in the major cities where demand for their services – and consequently the monetary incentive – is the highest.

Given the Brazilian government’s close ties with the pharmaceutical industry one might not be surprised to find out that the playing field is heavily tilted in favor of those doctors taught to adopt the “pill for every ill” mentality. But it’s curious to see how the Brazilian government – just like many or all other governments – restricts competition on the one hand through a system of licensure, while artificially introducing competition from abroad through the Mais Médicos program. After all, if people did not have to ask permission to be compensated for helping others heal there might not be any need for foreign doctors. Besides, the fact that wages are relatively meager would be less of a concern if Brazilians did not have to spend a fortune on a medical degree.

As usual, freedom is the answer. The only problem is there is no special interest group lobbying politicians for more freedom, because who but the ordinary man or woman benefits from that? As liberty-loving folk it is our job to inject this line of thinking into the public debate.

 

 

Mart van der Leer is an International Business graduate (B.B.A.) from The Netherlands. He spent time abroad in Denmark, South Korea, Spain and the United States as a student and intern before moving to South America. He also co-founded a local branch of Students for Liberty in Utrecht, The Netherlands and writes about libertarian issues at therawreport.org. Follow Mart on Twitter via @the_raw_report.

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